Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Moores Creek Battlefield Field Trip

Today, I got to chaperon Grace's class on a field trip to Moores Creek National Battlefield and since Nana and Paw are here visiting, they got to come too!  When the permission slip first came home for this field trip and I saw where they were going, I thought to myself that I had never even heard of Moores Creek National Battlefield.  But evidently it is a National Park near Burgaw, NC and it commemorates The Battle of Moores Creek Bridge on February 27, 1776.  "At Moores Creek Bridge a brief, violent clash at daybreak on February 27, 1776, saw patriots defeat a larger force of loyalists marching toward a rendezvous with a British naval squadron.  Brief, but important, the battle effectively ended royal authority in the North Carolina colony and stalled a full-scale British invasion of the South.  The patriot victory emboldened North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, to instruct its delegation to the Continental congress in Philadelphia to vote for independence from Britain.  It was the first American colony to do so."

So, we got up early that morning and picked us up some sub sandwiches for our lunch then stopped by the school and chatted with the bus driver to find out where this National Park was because Lola (our GPS) couldn't seem to locate it.  And let me tell you, it's out in the middle of no where.  That is why no one has ever heard of it!  If you would like to read more about Moores Creek National Battlefield, go here.

When we first got there, we were ushered into a building where our guide (a funny looking fellow with long sideburns which made me wonder if he was an Elvis impersonator on the side) showed us examples of 1770's living. We were shown the types of toys the kids would have played with, along with the types of weapons the men would have fought with and the clothes they would have worn. We also got a lesson of Highlander gear as well since they played an integral part in this particular battle.  After watching a brief DVD, where we learned about this epic battle that took place on a rickety old bridge, between the Loyalists (ie - the British as well as some Scottish) and the Patriots of North Carolina, we headed out into the woods to walk the very same path the loyalist took to track down the Patriots. 
Grace and Hennesie
Our wonderful Elvis impersonating tour guide
Nana and Grace - this is not the famous bridge that the battle took place on but it is the same creek near the spot.
Due to lack of time, the classes did not have time to do the whole tour.  Grace stayed with me and once the buses left, we drove over to the visitor center and walked the path to see the different monuments and look around in the visitor center.  And I'm so glad we did!  What we had seen earlier was neat but this was so much more interesting!  I hate that the rest of the kids missed it but I was so impressed with Grace.  She wanted to see every monument and read everything about them.
"To the Honored Memory 
of the Heroic Women 
of the Lower Cap Fear 
During the 
American Revolution
1775-1781"
Grace saw this mushroom and wanted me to take a picture of it because she said they had just studied mushrooms and Ms. Redford would like it.
This was a monument honoring all the Scottish Loyalist who fought and died in this battle.  The inscription reads:
"HERE FELL
CAPTAIN MCLEOD, CAPTAIN CAMPBELL
AND
ABOUT FIFTY HIGHLAND SCOTS
LOYALISTS; WHO, WITH SPLENDID
COURAGE, ASSAULTED WITH
CLAYMORES THE AMERICAN
ENTRENCHMENTS. THEY WERE
HEROES WHO DID THEIR
DUTY AS THEY SAW IT AND
ARE WORTHY OF THIS TRIBUTE
FROM THE DESCENDANTS OF
THE EQUALLY BRAVE MEN
WHOM THEY FOUGHT.
PEACE TO THEIR
ASHES."

I was completely amazed by this monument and the fact that the Patriots honored these men that they fought because "they were heroes who did their duty as they saw it".  That spoke very highly of them to me.

Grace and Paw looking at a monument honoring the Patriots only fallen hero, Pvt. John Grady.
As I was taking pictures of the monument, I looked over and saw Grace standing there beside the wrought iron fence and thought what a perfect picture.  I ended up snapping probably close to 40 pictures of her and the following are some of my favorites.
After we walked around and saw all the different monuments and read about them, we made our way into the visitor center and looked at the exhibits there.  We also watched the DVD which we all enjoyed more this time because we could see it and hear it better.
Within a few days after the battle, 850 Loyalists and their homes were searched.  Their weapons, ammunitions, and wagons were seized.  It was recorded: "350 guns (fowlers and shotguns) and shot bags, 150 dirks and swords, and 1,500 stand of arms (muskets and bayonets), 2 medicine chests, 13 wagons complete with teams, and 15,000 pounds sterling (coins) were seized."
We all had a great time even though the mosquitoes were terrible and I ended up with 45 bites on my legs alone!  

2 comments:

Name: The Bryant Family said...

had to look up your mushroom.

i think it could be this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

Giaellis2 said...

You had some GREAT shots Jillybean!